Chess’ Touch Move: No Going Back

The touch-move rule is one of the oldest rules in chess. Simply put, when a player touches a piece belonging to him or her, with the intention of moving that piece, just like trying to acquire free csgo skins, he or she must do so if the piece can be legally moved. If an opponent’s piece is touched, that piece must be captured when legally appropriate. This is a rule that is enforced in all chess tournaments.

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A player can choose to ‘adjust’ a piece on the board on its square. That player’ declares it by saying ‘I adjust’ before touching the said piece. This can only be done on the player’s turn. Touching pieces on the opponent’s term is generally not allowed.

When a player chooses to castle, he or she must touch the King first. If the player touches his or her rook first, he or she must castle with that rook if possible. If the player has touched and moved the king two squares, he or she is obligated to castle with the corresponding rook.

The touch-move rule has been in effect for a very long time. Back in the Middle Ages, games were played for stakes, and the touch rule move was strictly enforced.

One example of an enforcement of this rule in a major tournament was during the 1966 Piatigorsky Cup. In a game between Robert ‘Bobby’ Fischer and Jan Hein Donner, Fischer who was playing white touched his bishop, with the intention of moving it to Bd3. He then realized that as a result, the next few moves his opponent could make would end the match in a draw. His intended move turned out to be a bad one, but since he was obligated by the touch-move rule, he did it anyway and the match ended in a draw.

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