Best Chess Apps for Androids and iPhones

Chess is one of the oldest board games played for centuries generation after generation. It has been played for so long that the rules have been changed and tweaked several times as the years go by.

On the other hand, if you want to share your chess knowledge to the world, creating your own chess website, with the help of a reliable web hosting service like Certahosting.co.uk/, can be a good start.

Today, the most popular strategy game already has standard rules that are being followed by players worldwide. In fact, it is being played by enthusiasts from all walks of life, regardless of status, age, nationality, and race.

Technology has also caught up with chess as a sport. Today, a newbie can learn chess easily with the presence of several sites that are dedicated to the sport. There are also several applications in mobiles phones where you can learn and play chess against any kind of opponents, including artificial intelligence.

That said, below are the lists of different chess applications for Androids and iPhones that you can use to learn and play chess.

Learn Chess

If you want to learn this popular board game in the comfort of your phone, then this application is for you. Learn Chess is basically a tutorial application that will teach you the basics of the game, including rules and positions of the different chess pieces. It also allows you to train your basic game strategies such as different combination moves and opening and closing strategy. This is the best app for newbies and those who are still starting to learn the sport.

Chess.com

This is actually a website dedicated to chess. However, it also has an app of the same name that is available for downloading anytime. The application contains anything that is related to the sport including articles, instructional videos, and chess puzzles. On the other hand, the app will let you meet chess enthusiasts from all over the world where you can share your passion and ideas with other chess players.

Chess Free – Play Magnus

This application will let you play against chess world champion Magnus Carlsen. This is a fun app where you can choose the level of difficulty by selecting the age of Mr. Carlsen that you want to play against. The higher the age you choose, the harder it is to beat the current world champion. There are also free training videos that you can view if you want to improve and learn more about the sport.

WiFi Chess

There are several chess applications that let you play random players and even artificial intelligence; however, WiFi Chess is a bit different. This is an app where you can play the sport against anyone inside your home. The app will let you play against an opponent using a local WiFi, even without an internet. Both of you must download the app on your respective mobiles to play.

Chess for Kids

Chess is a sport for all ages, and this app is dedicated to kids who want to learn and play the sport. It is also perfect for students and teenagers who want to learn the basic rules and fundamentals of the game.

Conclusion

Chess is a sport that promotes patience and develops your strategy. If you want to learn and play the sport, the different applications listed above will be a big help in learning and improving your game.

Chess’ Touch Move: No Going Back

The touch-move rule is one of the oldest rules in chess. Simply put, when a player touches a piece belonging to him or her, with the intention of moving that piece, just like trying to acquire free csgo skins, he or she must do so if the piece can be legally moved. If an opponent’s piece is touched, that piece must be captured when legally appropriate. This is a rule that is enforced in all chess tournaments.

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A player can choose to ‘adjust’ a piece on the board on its square. That player’ declares it by saying ‘I adjust’ before touching the said piece. This can only be done on the player’s turn. Touching pieces on the opponent’s term is generally not allowed.

When a player chooses to castle, he or she must touch the King first. If the player touches his or her rook first, he or she must castle with that rook if possible. If the player has touched and moved the king two squares, he or she is obligated to castle with the corresponding rook.

The touch-move rule has been in effect for a very long time. Back in the Middle Ages, games were played for stakes, and the touch rule move was strictly enforced.

One example of an enforcement of this rule in a major tournament was during the 1966 Piatigorsky Cup. In a game between Robert ‘Bobby’ Fischer and Jan Hein Donner, Fischer who was playing white touched his bishop, with the intention of moving it to Bd3. He then realized that as a result, the next few moves his opponent could make would end the match in a draw. His intended move turned out to be a bad one, but since he was obligated by the touch-move rule, he did it anyway and the match ended in a draw.